HORSE SENSE

The horses’ senses are based on their status as prey animals, where they must be aware of their surroundings at all times.[67] They have the largest eyes of any land mammal,[68] and are lateral-eyed, meaning that their eyes are positioned on the sides of their heads.[69] This means that horses have a range of vision of more than 350°, with approximately 65° of this being binocular vision and the remaining 285° monocular vision.[68] Horses have excellent day and night vision, but they have two-color, or dichromatic vision; their color vision is somewhat like red-green color blindness in humans, where certain colors, especially red and related colors, appear as a shade of green.[70]

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Their sense of smell, while much better than that of humans, is not quite as good as that of a dog. It is believed to play a key role in the social interactions of horses as well as detecting other key scents in the environment. Horses have two olfactory centers. The first system is in the nostrils and nasal cavity, which analyze a wide range of odors. The second, located under the nasal cavity, are the Vomeronasal organs, also called Jacobson’s organs. These have a separate nerve pathway to the brain and appear to primarily analyze pheromones.[71]

A horse’s hearing is good,[67] and the pinna of each ear can rotate up to 180°, giving the potential for 360° hearing without having to move the head.[72] Noise impacts the behavior of horses and certain kinds of noise may contribute to stress: A 2013 study in the UK indicated that stabled horses were calmest in a quiet setting, or if listening to country or classical music, but displayed signs of nervousness when listening to jazz or rock music. This study also recommended keeping music under a volume of 21 decibels.[73] An Australian study found that stabled racehorses listening to talk radio had a higher rate of gastric ulcers than horses listening to music, and racehorses stabled where a radio was played had a higher overall rate of ulceration than horses stabled where there was no radio playing.[74]

Horses have a great sense of balance, due partly to their ability to feel their footing and partly to highly developedproprioception—the unconscious sense of where the body and limbs are at all times.[75] A horse’s sense of touch is well developed. The most sensitive areas are around the eyes, ears, and nose.[76] Horses are able to sense contact as subtle as an insect landing anywhere on the body.[77]

Horses have an advanced sense of taste, which allows them to sort through fodder and choose what they would most like to eat,[78] and their prehensile lips can easily sort even small grains. Horses generally will not eat poisonous plants, however, there are exceptions; horses will occasionally eat toxic amounts of poisonous plants even when there is adequate healthy food.[79]

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